Posts Tagged: cities

The Perfect City for Millennials?

Millennials are seen as hyper-modern trendsetters – but when looking for a city to live in, some of their preferences are surprisingly conservative, new research reveals. New research by rentals portal Abodo reveals that the cliché of Generation Y seemingly doesn’t translate into what they’re looking for when moving to a new city. They asked… Read more »

How To Make Expensive Cities Affordable For Everyone Again

Last week, we wrote about a new report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office that found that poorer neighborhoods that have added more market-rate housing in the Bay Area since 2000 have been less likely to experience displacement. The idea is counterintuitive but consistent with what many economists theorize: Build more housing, and the cost… Read more »

We Want More Walkable Neighborhoods – but Can Our Communities Deliver?

“The most requested neighborhood characteristic of all buyers is walkability,” real estate broker Andrea Evers recently told a reporter for The Washington Post. But, in an article written by the Post’s Michele Lerner, Evers went on to say that “very few areas” in the greater DC market meet the desired criterion, particularly if the prospective… Read more »

The Biggest Force Driving Gentrification?

The Louis and The Harper are high-end apartment buildings on 14th Street in the heart of one of DC’s hottest neighborhoods. (Andre Chung for The Washington Post) When we think about the reasons behind the movement of younger, higher-income people into center cities — reversing the decades-long trend of suburbanization — lots of things come… Read more »

How Downtowns Succeed

I had anticipated some of the rewards and discoveries of visiting cities in the process of economic and cultural recovery and re-invention. An unexpected reward has been the chance to get a time-capsule view, a kind of real-life time-line diorama, of how the downtown areas of cities look through all the stages of a decline-and-rise… Read more »

The Rise of Singles

Over the last half-century in America, it’s become acceptable, then increasingly common, then entirely unremarkable, to live alone. Women who once lived with their families until their wedding day now live alone. Men delaying marriage later into their 20s live alone. Divorces, more common today than in 1950, live alone. And seniors who live longer… Read more »

Vertical Agriculture

The 21st century has seen rapid urbanisation and the global population is now expected to grow to more than 8.3 billion by 2050. Currently, 800m hectares – 38% of the earth’s land surface – is farmed and we’ll soon need to give over another 100m hectares if we continue to use current agricultural methods. That’s… Read more »

Is the US Undergoing a Mass Gentrification?

Census data suggests that in 1980 a college graduate could expect to earn about 38 percent more than a worker with only a high-school diploma. Since then, the difference in their wages has only widened as our economy has shifted to bestow greater and greater rewards on the well-educated. By 2000, that number was about… Read more »

What Makes a City Gay Friendly?

In celebration of Pride Month, I’m taking a little excursion around the U.S., breezing through some old and new gay friendly places. This week, a general look-see at the country as a whole and then next, a close-up on our fair state of California. Let’s start with the criteria. What does it mean, exactly, to… Read more »

A Billionaire Could Buy Your Whole City

Just how rich is Bill Gates? According to Forbes, he’s the world’s richest person and is worth $77.5 billion. But that kind of wealth is hard to wrap your head around, so let’s put it another way: Gates could buy every single home in the entire city of Boston. That’s 114,212 single-family homes, condos and… Read more »

Is the US Real Estate Market Stalling?

After picking up momentum over the last couple of years, there are some signs that the US housing market may be slowing. The Washington Post reports: The third installment of Freddie’s “Multi-Indicator Market Index” (or MiMi), which sizes up homebuying activity and other factors, found that only 10 states and the District of Columbia fall… Read more »

The Best Overlooked Cities for Gay Twentysomethings

“Best cities lists” for those who identify as LGBT are often pretty predictable: New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Berlin, Provincetown, you know the drill. Lists that continue to look only to these obvious strongholds miss out on a growing number of other equally exciting and progressive locations around the world that are ideal for… Read more »

Majority of Homes in Seven Major Metros Now Unaffordable for Locals

More than half the homes currently on the market in seven major American metros are currently unaffordable for local residents, according to a Zillow(R) analysis of Q4 2013 income, mortgage and home value data. Additionally, homebuyers looking for affordable properties may increasingly be forced to search on the perimeter of the country’s largest metro markets,… Read more »

Cities, Real Estate, and Parking Spaces

Why do cities need so many parking spaces? Andrew Sullivan at The Dish reports: Michael Manville of UCLA studied a liberalization of parking regulations in one section of Los Angeles and found that deregulation leads to the construction of more housing units and fewer parking spaces. Conversely, tighter regulation leads to a lack of affordable… Read more »

NerdWallet Names the 10 Most Gay-Friendly Cities in the US

And the top three are Palm Springs, San Francisco and Seattle. NerdWallet reports: Happy Pride Month! To celebrate, NerdWallet crunched the numbers to put together a list of the most gay-friendly cities based on municipal laws, community and peer support, and safety and tolerance. The cities listed fulfill the following three requirements: Do the laws… Read more »

Cities or Suburbs – The Next Trend?

If you Google the term “a scholar and a gentleman,” the first result to pop up is a picture of Witold Rybczynski — or it would be if there were any justice in the world. Rybczynski is an architect, author, and professor of urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania. He has written a dozen or… Read more »